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Dot Travel – The rise and fall of a brilliant concept

dottravel6.jpgI wrote about “dot travel” on my blog in the past, and just for the record, personally I still believe in the original dot travel concept, as well as the purity of the dot travel domain extension for travel and tourism related web addresses. However, I was saddened when I read the press release below, and I realized that the dot travel concept may have been killed by greed and short-term vision.

 

.travel to release nearly 300,000 destination names.
.travel domain registrar, EnCirca issued a .travel advisory regarding the release of nearly 300,000 reserved destination names. Effective with the new relaxed eligibility policy, the .travel registry is planning to release thousands of reserved place names, such as cities, iconic cultural sites and world heritage landmarks. These .travel domain names are ideal for search engine marketing since keywords in domain names are given extra weight in search engine rankings. Destination management organizations and tourism boards had until December 21, 2007 to secure their destination names from EnCirca before they are released for public registration.
(For Immediate Release – Travel News Distribution, December 2007)

To track back, in January of 2006, Ron Andruff and his business partner Cherian Mathei launched dot travel officially to the global travel and tourism industry in New York , after many years of collaborating with industry leaders and ICANN. The concept was a brilliant one, which had the potential to open up tourism for smaller destinations and small medium enterprises, even in areas of the world that

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do not have the big advertising budgets or brand awareness. It also had the great potential to bring a bit of order into the mess of finding travel-related information on the Internet (now the biggest category on the Web). Furthermore, by making online travel more consumer friendly and reducing browsers’ frustration, this initiative would have helped grow a stronger tourism industry world-wide.

Every great concept makes or breaks with the execution. I believed in the founding team as Ron focused his efforts in building relationships with the industry to embrace this new domain name and tried to make travel and tourism organizations understand that this is THEIR domain. As CEO of Tralliance, his organization was responsible for the administration and marketing of dot travel both to the industry and to the consumer. It was critical to get critical mass and industry buy-in prior to marketing to consumers as the value proposition (being able to type in any destination and travel supplier followed by dot travel into the browser address bar and being directed to the official website of that respective organization). Exciting projects were underway in Canada, China, Africa, Asia, Brunei, Egypt, and the Caribbean to name the

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biggest initiatives. Canada for example, led by the Canadian Tourism Commission and the Travel Industry Association of Canada went out to engage the tourism industry to register their relevant place names in order to build a value proposition for consumers to find Canadian destinations, landmarks, parks, and heritage sites by just typing in the destination followed by dot travel – not only was Canada.travel positioned as being consumer-centric online, but also better able to increase tourism revenues and awareness to smaller destinations and tourism businesses. The “Canada Model” was cited by many nations as a best practice to follow. China.travel on the other hand was designed to be a monumental task to index all Chinese tourism businesses for the first time, and put them online.

Ron also set up an organization (TTPC) that independently from Tralliance was responsible for the protection of the policies and rules of the authentication process – the crown jewels of the concept. The authentication process made sure that only the correct owner of a brand was able to register the respective domain name(s), and that destination, heritage sites, countries, cities, etc. (called place names) were protected from for a period of time (and major destinations such as countries were protected forever). These registered and authenticated domain names were then fed into a database that populated an online directory and search engine.

 

 

A brilliant idea and all seemed to go so well….but what happened??? Operating a venture like that is not cheap obviously, and even though it is a good cause, it still required investors. The Globe.com, an operator of several internet and technology ventures agreed to invest in Tralliance, and at some point gained majority interest. Nothing wrong at that point – but that unfortunately changed when The Globe unexpectedly decided to operate Tralliance and take control of the execution of the .travel concept by pushing Ron and his team out. A very aggressive business practice led to the sale and registration of domain names that were not in line with the authentication process. Letters and calls both to Ed Cespedes, the new CEO of Tralliance, Michael Eagan, Chairman of The Globe, and Birger Bachman, Chairman of TTPC unfortunately did not result in any action. The train was going down the rails, and one could foresee the crash. Other passionate board members of TTPC distanced themselves from dot travel when they realized the sudden change in execution, led by the new management. Probably with good reason, since Labigroup (owned by the CEO of .travel) agreed to buy 25,000 .travel domains a year from the registrars of .travel.

On December 20, 2007, the Company, through its subsidiary, Tralliance Corporation (“Tralliance”), entered into a Bulk Registration Co-Marketing Agreement (the “Agreement”) with Labigroup, under Tralliance’s Bulk Purchasing Program available to entities committing to a minimum purchase of 25,000 “.travel” domain names within one-year. Labigroup is controlled by the Company’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Michael Egan and our remaining directors own a minority interest in Labigroup. Under the Agreement, Labigroup committed to purchase a predetermined minimum number of “.travel” domain names on a bulk basis from an accredited “.travel” registrar of its own choosing and to establish a predetermined minimum number of related “.travel” websites. As consideration for the “.travel” domain names to be purchased under the Agreement, Labigroup agreed to pay certain fixed fees and make other payments, including but not limited to, an ongoing royalty calculated as a % share of its Net Revenue, as defined in the Agreement, to Tralliance. The Agreement has an initial term which expires September 30, 2010, after which it may be renewed for successive periods of two and three years, respectively. Labigroup has paid Tralliance the sum of $262,500 under the Agreement to date. (Source: Securities and Exchange Commission, Washington D.C, December 20, 2007)

Just one clear example:
tours.travel – registered by Labitrav on December 20th, 2007, just hours before the opening. Labitrav (Labigroup it is mentioned in the SEC filling) it is also based in Fort Lauderdale, such as Tralliance.

The result will be just another domain name with a valuable domain extension, but without the powerful authentication. So if you wanted to type in ABCdestination.travel , you may now land on the website of an aggressive link farm site or a company that has nothing to do with ABC destination, instead of the official ABC destination site – without having to find out the correct (possibly dot com) domain name, or sifting through millions of search results on your favorite search engine. And the dot travel directory, a searchable database of authenticated domain names, which was supposed to become the purest source of relevant travel information online, is now cluttered with irrelevant, inappropriate links offering little value. Gone the dream of order in online travel. The opportunity to build consumers’ trust shattered.

But who is to blame in the end?

 

– Is it Ron Andruff and his founding Tralliance team, for needing an investor that unfortunately had a different agenda?

 

– Is it Ed Cespedes and Michael Eagan from The Globe, the new Tralliance Management: for trying to make money quickly off a great concept, but in their haste destroying the value proposition?

– Is it the TTPC Board of Directors under chairmanship of Birger Bachman, for not guarding the “crown jewels” and therefore letting the value proposition dilute, and for not listening to the outrcrys from the travel industry?

 

– Is it ICANN, the governing body of Internet domain names, for not taking back the dot travel domain name when the strategy went into a different direction?

 

– Is it the global Travel and Tourism industry, for not embracing the dot travel domain name extension fast enough, that motivated the new Tralliance Management to open registration up to make money?

 

– Is it the UNWTO, the World Tourism Organization, and travel trade associations all over the world (such as PATA, DMAI, ASTA, NTA, etc.), for not stepping in and get more involved to make dot travel a UNWTO priority earlier?

 

– Is it National Tourism Organizations and Destination Marketing Organizations for not encouraging their industry partners and members more aggressively to register their names?

 

– Or is it maybe even the Consumer for not embracing the dot travel domain fast enough to show value to doubting travel organizations?

 

 

 

In any case, I don’t think anybody is to blame and everybody is to blame at least a little bit (some more than others obviously, you can make up your own mind…) – but it just confirms how hard it is to execute a concept, as brilliant it may be – if there is not one entity responsible and in control of the outcome, and if one of the driving forces has agendas that are more self-centered than for the long-tem benefit of the global travel and tourism industry. However, it is clear that a lot of passionate travel and tourism professionals came together with the best intentions to make the online travel landscape more consumer friendly. Dan Luzadder, a Travel Weekly reporter wrote a couple very well researched articles that provide further background information on the developments behind the dot travel concept: Tralliance is changing dot-travel rules in a bid to expand traffic (Dec 27, 2007 – http://www.travelweekly.com/articles.aspx?articleid=59739 ), and Masters of the domain – the future of dot travel (Sept 11, 2007 – http://www.travelweekly.com/articles.aspx?articleid=58063 ).

 

To close, nevertheless I believe that dot travel domain name is still a powerful domain name, which will not go away. The domain name is pure, and at least for English-speaking markets and search engines brings tremendous value. That has very little to do with the concept overall, however it is obvious that if the concept could have been executed, the use of the domain name for travel organizations would have been a lot more powerful – simply because the consumer would have seen the value proposition.

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It’s a little bit like Google – a superior search engine technology became the most powerful Internet company, not by spending billions in advertising but just by being consumer centric. But still, Ontario.travel is still a more powerful domain name that OntarioTravel.net, and Canada.travel is easier to remember than CanadaKeepExploring.com – or is it not?

So is there hope, or is

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the concept dead without any possibility of revival? Well, I think everything is possible, but a true miracle would have to happen – driven by the global travel and tourism industry, and ICANN itself to save the travel industries opportunity to bring order and trust to online travel.

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In the meantime however, I predict the decline of new truly authenticated dot travel domain name registrations, and a decline in renewals…

Hopefully there can be lessons learned. Any future initiative designed to build consumers’ trust – whether it be around relevance, quality, “greenness” or authenticity had better anticipate the threat of greed and short-termism and have developed plans to mitigate same. All the more reason to encourage greater global collaboration and standard setting.

———————–

Jens Thraenhart (www.Thraenhart.com) is a global travel, tourism and hospitality strategist who operates the Tourism Internet Marketing Blog (www.TourismInternetMarketing.com), and is Editor-in-Chief of the “Tips from the T-List” (www.TipsFromTheTlist.com). Currently he works for the Canadian Tourism Commission as Executive Director of Marketing Strategy, but starting February 2008, he will re-launch his consulting practice Chameleon Strategies (www.ChameleonStrategies.com), as well as joining the executive management team of August Hotels & Properties, among other start-up ventures that he will be involved with.

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16 Comments

Comment by David J Castello
2008-01-18 06:17:23

Excellent article.
Note: Ontario.travel may be more attractive than OntarioTravel.net (what isn’t?), but it is nowhere in the same league as Ontario.com.

 
Comment by Jens
2008-01-20 14:32:42

Thanks for your comment David. I completely agree with you. In the case of the Canadian Tourism Commission – believe me, we would love to have Canada.com! And I am sure OTMP (Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership)would love to have Ontario.com, but unfortunately both names are not available.

 
Comment by Ashwin Kamlani
2008-02-02 17:19:43

Hello Jens, very well said. As you know we bought in heavily to the .travel concept and moved 2 of our entire brands over to .travel… hoping to set an example and have other chains or hotels follow our lead. The first time I regretted it was when I got a phone call from someone at .travel telling me that if I didn’t register the other .travel domains that I had been authenticated to register, that they could be registered by someone else. Obviously this was a complete contradiction to the ‘dream’ that was sold by TheGlobe and Ron. I don’t blame Ron, because I believe he left when he realized that the integrity of the concept would not remain intact. We are now abandoning our .travel names, and will have to try the UDRP process to get back the .com names that we lost to pirates.

 
Comment by Jens
2008-02-03 01:25:16

We just came across this interesting story from today at Yahoo Finance (http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/080201/nyf090.html?.v=78):

theglobe.com Announces Intent to Sell Substantially All of the Business and Net Assets of Tralliance Corporation and to Issue Approximately 269 Million New Shares of theglobe.com Common Stock to the Registry Management Company LLC
Friday February 1, 5:06 pm ET

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Feb. 1 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — theglobe.com (OTC Bulletin Board: TGLO – News) announced today that it has entered into a letter of intent to sell substantially all of the business and net assets of its Tralliance Corporation subsidiary, and to issue approximately 269 million shares of its common stock, to The Registry Management Company LLC, a privately held entity controlled by Michael S. Egan, theglobe.com’s Chairman, CEO and controlling investor (the “Transaction”).
As part of the purchase consideration for the Transaction, Mr. Egan and certain of his affiliates will exchange and surrender all of their right, title and interest to secured convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of approximately $4.7 million, accrued and unpaid interest thereon, as well as outstanding rent and miscellaneous fees due and unpaid to Mr. Egan’s affiliates, which amounts collectively equal approximately $6.0 million.

In addition, The Registry Management Company will pay an earn-out to theglobe.com equal to 10% (subject to certain minimums) of The Registry Management Company’s net revenue derived from “.travel” names registered by the Company through May 5, 2015. The net present value of the minimum guaranteed earn-out payments is estimated to be approximately $1.3 million, bringing the total consideration to approximately $7.3 million.

The Transaction is subject to the negotiation and closing of a definitive purchase agreement, receipt of an independent fairness opinion, and shareholder approval. The Transaction is expected to close no earlier than the second quarter of 2008.

Safe Harbor — this press release includes forward-looking statements related to theglobe.com, inc. that involve risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, risks and uncertainties relating to whether or not the proposed Transaction will be consummated. No definitive agreement has been entered into between theglobe and The Registry Management Company, and even if one is executed in the future, the anticipated conditions to closing of such an agreement, some of which are specified above, may not be satisfied. Our ability to curtail or reduce expenses also involves many risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are made in reliance on the “Safe Harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For further information about these and other factors that could affect theglobe.com’s future results and business plans, please see the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including in particular our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006 and our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2007. Copies of these filings are available online at http://www.sec.gov. Prospective investors are cautioned that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance. Actual results may differ materially and adversely from management expectations.

Contact:
Edward Cespedes
954-769-5948
edc@corp.theglobe.com

Comment by Patrick
2008-02-03 23:16:08

Speculation can be regrettable, and reading such strong personal opinions of withdrawal from the .dot travel initiative is demonstrative of shortsightedness and frustrations from unrealistic expectations.

As representative of the dot travel initiative in Spain and sole authenticator for the Spanish market, I would like to share that there has been significant nervousness in the passed months as the last of reserved domains where being released under ICANN pressures for more transparency and independence.

You judge it as betrayal of a ‘dream’, on the contrary, I think it’s more about shaking the industry out of a lethargy to become a more proactive stakeholder of a TLD domain which depends exclusively on the participation of the industry, which in time will be recognized and valued by users and consumers alike.

Early adopters may not have received enough accolades and recognition by the sector, but frankly setting realistic measures of success is what its all about – because we are not exactly in an industry that is haled by its high rate of innovation, neither for its rapid adoption of innovation.

I believe that the .travel initiative has to be considered within the broader state of affairs of e-commerce. When looking for example at the hotel sector and at the average booking rates by propriety web sites, we can only witness that the bulk of the industry has not even reached Web 1.0 standards, let alone aspiring to reach 2010 with web 2.0 capabilities. Similarly looking at marketing expenses across the board, the hotel industry is a recognised lagger in terms of building in-house marketing expertise to tackle e-commerce with success in a non-merchant dependent business model.

As domain lead concept strategies, e-crm and social media strategies are clearly talked about concepts, these are only practiced with relative success by a few, which by no means constitutes sufficient reason for abandonment of what is proving to be the battle ground for 2008.

So I’m more inclined to follow Jens’s view that there is a shared responsibility by all, but lets be realistic – to achieve successful results in e-commerce, today more than ever its about taking control. We are in 2008, .travel is here to stay – so what are we going to do about it – marketing folks?

Our faith is being tested, traditional forms of marketing, media and advertising are in an all time low, User generated media is challenging forms of appeal and corporate communications.

Nevertheless the .travel initiative is still largely unexplored territory, which demands more from our capacity to manage change and uncertainty more than that which is required in the ‘.com-fortable’ world.

We are in need of strong and sustained leadership; strong brands and determined destinations to use the .travel as part of their online marketing strategies to drive forward their differentiated offer and services.

 
Comment by Patrick
2008-02-03 23:27:34

Greetings to all,

Speculation can be regrettable, and reading such strong personal opinions of withdrawal from the .dot travel initiative is demonstrative of shortsightedness and frustrations from unrealistic expectations.

As representative of the dot travel initiative in Spain and sole authenticator for the Spanish market, I would like to share that there has been significant nervousness in the passed months as the last of reserved domains where being released under ICANN pressures for more transparency and independence.

You judge it as betrayal of a ‘dream’, on the contrary, I think it’s more about shaking the industry out of a lethargy to become a more proactive stakeholder of a TLD domain which depends exclusively on the participation of the industry, which in time will be recognized and valued by users and consumers alike.

Early adopters may not have received enough accolades and recognition by the sector, but frankly setting realistic measures of success is what its all about – because we are not exactly in an industry that is haled by its high rate of innovation, neither for its rapid adoption of innovation.

I believe that the .travel initiative has to be considered within the broader state of affairs of e-commerce. When looking for example at the hotel sector and at the average booking rates by propriety web sites, we can only witness that the bulk of the industry has not even reached Web 1.0 standards, let alone aspiring to reach 2010 with web 2.0 capabilities. Similarly looking at marketing expenses across the board, the hotel industry is a recognised lagger in terms of building in-house marketing expertise to tackle e-commerce with success in a non-merchant dependent business model.

As domain lead concept strategies, e-crm and social media strategies are clearly talked about concepts, these are only practiced with relative success by a few, which by no means constitutes sufficient reason for abandonment of what is proving to be the battle ground for 2008.

So I’m more inclined to follow Jens’s view that there is a shared responsibility by all, but lets be realistic – to achieve successful results in e-commerce, today more than ever its about taking control. We are in 2008, .travel is here to stay – so what are we going to do about it – marketing folks?

Our faith is being tested, traditional forms of marketing, media and advertising are in an all time low, User generated media is challenging forms of appeal and corporate communications.

Nevertheless the .travel initiative is still largely unexplored territory, which demands more from our capacity to manage change and uncertainty more than that which is required in the ‘.com-fortable’ world.

We are in need of strong and sustained leadership; strong brands and determined destinations to use the .travel as part of their online marketing strategies to drive forward their differentiated offer and services.

 
 
Comment by Jens Thraenhart
2008-02-14 02:20:10

And the saga continues…please read an article from Travel Weekly:

Tralliance is sold; dot-travel domain now privately held

February 11, 2008

By Dan Luzadder

Tralliance, the company that controls the dot-travel domain, has been taken private, removing its finances and activities from the scrutiny of public markets.

Until now, Tralliance, the official registry of dot-travel addresses, has been a publicly traded subsidiary of TheGlobe.com, which in turn is publicly traded over the counter.

On Feb. 1, TheGlobe.com announced that it had sold Tralliance to the Registry Management Co., a privately held enterprise.

However, the sale did not change the ultimate ownership or control of the company by travel industry entrepreneur Mike Egan, owner and chairman of TheGlobe.com, and his financial partner, Ed Cespedes, the president of Tralliance, who together own RMC.

“We’re doing this for efficiency reasons,” Cespedes said of the sale. “Let’s face it: It costs a lot of money to keep Tralliance as a public company. It’s money that could be spent in promoting the dot-travel domain instead.”

The sale came close on the heels of significant policy changes at the start of the year that company executives said would allow them to turn the travel-oriented domain from a little-used online marketplace into a major player in the industry.

That process began last fall when Tralliance fired dot-travel’s founder, president and promoter, Ron Andruff, and announced that it would treat the dot-travel domain as a for-profit business, rather than as a service to the travel industry. Andruff, who remains a stockholder and who tried unsuccessfully after his dismissal to buy Tralliance, declined to comment last week.

Bill Maloney, executive vice president of ASTA and a former member of the Travel Partnership Corp., dot-travel’s advisory board, said he was unaware of the sale but added that taking Tralliance private raised some questions in his mind.

“What the industry loses, of course, is transparency,” Maloney said.

The sale also closely follows a decision last month by Tralliance to initiate so-called bulk sales of dot-travel domain names at discount prices. Under the new sales plan, Cespedes said, anyone buying 25,000 or more names will get a rebate.

But so far, just one such sale has been acknowledged by the company: the purchase of 200,000 destination and service-oriented domain names by Egan and Cespedes themselves.

Cespedes confirmed last week that he and Egan had created a new enterprise named LabiGroup, which in turn acquired 200,000 names to help build working destinations. The dot-travel top-level domain has struggled to find buyers willing to actually build dot-travel Web sites and use them for travel-related businesses. Until the LabiGroup purchase, only about 30,000 names had been sold, and most of them have not been used.

“Rather than keep talking about it, we said, ‘We’ll put a bulk purchase program in place and talk to guys who will commit money, real money, to dot-travel,’ ” Cespedes said. “So we are leading by example. We are putting up sites around destinations, around services and around things that we believe people are interested in concerning travel, so that when the millions of people who type in dot-travel every month — some 8 to 10 million are doing so — they will find something they’re looking for.”

Cespedes would not disclose how much LabiGroup paid for those 200,000 names, but even when allowing for pricing discounts, the purchase would have required an estimated $2 million investment.

The sales agreement values Tralliance at $7.3 million.

Benefits to new ownership

Cespedes told Travel Weekly that the new ownership would be invisible to buyers and owners of dot-travel domain names. He said it would reduce fixed costs for Tralliance as it redoubles efforts to raise the profile of the struggling domain-name business and boosts participation in dot-travel within the global travel industry.

Cespedes said the sale would not bring changes to management, policies or to Tralliance’s relationship to TTPC, which was established when the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, better known as ICANN, approved the domain three years ago.

Because TheGlobe.com is publicly traded, Cespedes said he could not comment on details of the transaction beyond what was revealed in the public announcement. But he said TheGlobe.com would offer more details in a regulatory filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission this week.

Terms of the transaction that have been disclosed call for Egan and business affiliates that have invested in Tralliance, primarily other Egan-controlled entities, to waive their interest in convertible promissory notes worth about $4.7 million as well as other fees and debt totaling about $6 million.

An earn-out provision, based on the performance of Tralliance after the sale, could add another $1.3 million to the deal. TheGlobe also will issue 269 million shares of common stock to the Registry Management Co., the company noted.

Cespedes said that under new policies recently approved by TTPC, he and Egan, like other purchasers of dot-travel domain names, have 60 days following the purchase of a dot-travel domain name to open a working Web site for each name.

He said LabiGroup had used a computer program to pick potential names and had then eyeballed each name (e.g. Mississippi.travel, SpringBreak.travel and SpringBreakHotel.travel) to ensure that they were not too long, made sense and were likely to attract travel shoppers.

Meeting the deadline for getting Web sites up and running for each of those 200,000 domain names presents a significant challenge, Cespedes said.

“It’s not only a lot to do but exceptionally expensive,” he said. “We have to build the sites. That takes time and more money. It is a big risk and a big investment, but we’re willing to make it, as we always have been.”

In the end, Cespedes said, there is still a lot of room for bulk and individual sales.

Cespedes said Tralliance was planning a marketing campaign later this year that would include magazine and television advertising.

He said the company had also hired a public relations expert to help raise the profile of the dot-travel domain.

 
2008-02-14 21:02:43

As a representative of Tralliance Corporation, I wanted to personally clarify how this affects the future of the .travel domain.

The intended sale will not result in changes to management, policies, or to Tralliance’s relationship with the TTPC. We will continue to manage and promote the .travel domain name. Under the new structure, Tralliance will operate more efficiently and cost savings generated from the transaction will allow us to allocate more dollars to the promotion of the domain.

You can already see some of the shift. We are making ourselves available to the industry by becoming active participants at assocation meetings and trade shows. Some of our up and coming events are TIA’s NCSTD meeting at the end of February as well as ITB and Le Map Monde in March.

Heidi Siefkas-Cassemiro
Tralliance Corporation, the .travel Registry

 
Comment by Aaron
2008-02-18 21:49:48

Put simply, .travel is an answer to a question no one really asked.

You can’t blame consumers, the travel industry, tourism organizations, etc. for not adopting a product that they really didn’t want or need to begin with. I would argue that your premise that it was a great concept to begin with is false in the sense that there really isn’t a viable market for .travel domains. The market that Tralliance perceived was there – wasn’t interested (which is now obvious), therefore the execution was doomed from the beginning.

 
Comment by Rob Hughes
2008-02-19 20:38:11

Further to your posts above – I received yet another call from a dot travel representative (not a domain registrar sales person) last week asking if they could assist in locating MORE dot travel domains for us, based on our products and services. They are obviously being very aggressive in unloading these.

My concern is still the high price for these domains – they are very costly relative to other common domains. Will the price come down now that the authentication process has been removed? Price certainly contributed to the slow adoption?

 
Comment by Meilee
2008-04-08 19:43:13

Well said – what a great entry!

 
Comment by Jeff L
2008-04-13 03:15:35

Withe scarcity of good domains names out there in the .com,.ca, .net, etc world, there may yet be another day for .travel.

I think much of the blame has to lie at the feet of the poor adoption among destination marketers, but indeed it would be sad if all these names just end up being adsense sites.

 
Comment by Sam Trawley
2008-04-15 08:48:27

The dot.travel was not really a bad idea, but I think that the concept had it coming. For one thing, traveling has always being about the physical nature, and even if you use dot.travel for nothing more then looking up tips, I think a social network like http://www.trekcafe.com would be better…

 
Comment by Pete Lyons
2008-12-26 02:30:14

We registered our dot travel domain name, however, this has yielded absolutely nothing to increase traffic, OR our bottom line.

Aside from the high annual registration price irritant, our listing from “Search dot travel” – which contains a hyperlink to our primary site – does not appear to have ever been harvested / indexed by Google.

Precious dollars NOT well spent. I do not believe that “dot travel” has a strong or viable enough foothold to justify the cost. If, however, the annual cost were to come down to one tenth of the current price, then perhaps we will reconsider.

 
Comment by DaveCahonne
2009-03-10 14:12:19

Never underestimate the power of the internet. An increasing number of people use the internet
to search for a business or service so having a web presence is an important media for promoting
your company. Web design is a real skill and if your website is to not only look good but work well,
it should be constructed by a professional web designer.

If you are interested, you can contact me: hqwebdesign (AT) gmail (DOT) com

 
Comment by demonimoux
2009-07-06 00:36:01

Hello

Nice site. I just added it to favorites 🙂

Thanks and see ya
Szczecin hotel

 

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